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By HOBBLE CREEK DENTAL CARE
November 14, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures

Would you like to help your child avoid the pain of cavities? Dental sealants offer a simple way to reduce your son or daughter's tooth sealantsdecay risk. Dr. Stephen Pratt, Stephanie Winterton and Dr. Christopher Flint, who practice family dentistry at Hobble Creek Dental Care in Springville, UT, explain how sealants can protect your child's teeth.

What are sealants?

Sealants fill nooks and crannies in your child's pre-molars and molars located in the back of the mouth. Because these grooves are so small, it's impossible to remove cavity-causing plaque from them with a toothbrush. The longer plaque remains on a tooth, the greater the chance that tooth decay will occur. Adding a coating of plastic resin to the teeth prevents plaque from forming in the depressions in your child's teeth.

Why are sealants recommended for children?

Newly erupted molars and pre-molars are particularly susceptible to tooth decay. Coating the teeth with sealants prevents cavities from damaging these teeth and also helps your child avoid fillings and other dental procedures. Although fillings restore teeth damaged by tooth decay, they also tend to weaken them, which can increase the risk of a crack or fracture in the future. Sealants prevent complications, like cracks, by stopping cavities from ever forming.

Can adults get sealants too?

Sealants are also helpful in protecting your teeth from cavities. Although many dental insurance carriers cover sealants for children, the same coverage generally isn't available for adults, who must pay for the sealants out of pocket.

Is the sealant process painful?

Applying sealants to your child's teeth only takes a few minutes and is completely pain-free. Before the sealants are applied, the teeth are cleaned and dried thoroughly. Adding an etching solution to the teeth helps ensure the resin sealant material will adhere properly. After the solution is applied in our Springville office, the liquid resin sealants are painted on your child's pre-molars and molars with a small brush. A special curing light hardens the sealants, turning them into a strong, solid coating that plaque can't penetrate.

Interested in learning how you can protect your child's teeth with this important family dentistry service? Call Springville, UT, dentists Drs. Pratt and Winterton at Hobble Creek Dental Care at (801) 489-4541 to schedule an appointment.

By Hobble Creek Dental Care
November 14, 2017
Category: Oral Health
Tags: teething  
WeathertheStormofTeethingwithTheseComfortTips

Teething is a normal part of your baby’s dental development. That doesn’t make it less stressful, though, for you or your baby.

This natural process occurs as your child’s primary teeth sequentially erupt through the gums over a period of two or three years. The first are usually the two lower front teeth followed by the two upper front ones, beginning (give or take a couple of months) between six and nine months. By the age of three, most children have all twenty of their primary teeth.

The disruption to the gum tissues can cause a number of unpleasant side effects including gum swelling, facial rash, drooling, disrupted sleep patterns and decreased appetite. As a result a child can become irritable, bite and gnaw to relieve gum discomfort or rub their ears. Every child’s experience is different as well as their degree of pain and discomfort.

As a tooth is about to erupt, you may notice symptoms increasing a few days before and after. The symptoms will then subside until the next tooth begins to erupt. In a way, teething is much like a storm—you mostly have to ride it out. However, that doesn’t mean you can’t lessen your child’s discomfort during the teething episode.

For one thing, cold, soft items like teething rings, pacifiers or even a clean, wet washcloth your child can gnaw on will help relieve gum pressure. Chilling the item can have a pain-numbing effect—but avoid freezing temperatures, which can burn the tissues. You can also massage the gums with a clean finger to relieve pain. But don’t rub alcohol on their gums and only use numbing agents (like Benzocaine) for children older than two, and only with the advice and supervision of your healthcare provider. The use of acetaminophen or ibuprofen might also be used under the advice of your doctor.

If you notice your child has diarrhea, extensive rashes or fever, contact your physician immediately—these aren’t normal teething symptoms and may indicate something more serious. And be sure to consult with us if you have any other questions or concerns.

Teething can be a difficult time for your baby and family. But with these tips and a little “TLC” you can keep their discomfort to a minimum.

If you would like more information on caring for your baby’s developing teeth, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Teething Troubles: How to Help Your Baby be Comfortable.”

By Hobble Creek Dental Care
October 30, 2017
Category: Oral Health
MayimBialiksHalloweenFairyHelpsKeepHerKidsTeethCavity-Free

Halloween is great fun for kids… but maybe not so much fun for their teeth. Is there a way for this much-anticipated holiday to be less stressful to oral health? Actress Mayim Bialik of The Big Bang Theory thinks so! In an interview with Dear Doctor magazine, the mother of two young sons said, “We don't do candy for Halloween. We have a Halloween fairy who takes it all away, and they get to choose a small LEGO toy in its place.”

Though this may not work for every family, it’s definitely an idea worth considering. After all, depending on how much candy your kids take in from trick-or-treating, they may have a supply that lasts for days or even weeks — and a steady diet of sticky sweets is just what their teeth don’t need.

Why is candy so bad for teeth? Disease-causing oral bacteria feed on the sugars in the candy. In the process of breaking down the sugar, the bacteria produce acids that start to break down the protective enamel covering of teeth — forming small holes, or cavities. This allows the bacteria to get deeper inside the tooth, increasing the size of the cavity. While this can happen with any food that contains sugar, the stickiness of many candies make them harder to clean off the teeth — essentially giving the bacteria more time to do their damage.

Is there anything that can be done — short of the candy exchange Mayim Bialik has managed to implement in her house? Nothing that would be as effective as eliminating candy altogether as Mayim has done, but there are a few ways to reduce the potential for harm. For example, you can try to weed out the stickiest candies, like taffy, and hard candies that stay in the mouth a long time. You can make sure your kids eat them only as a dessert at mealtime, and not throughout the day. And you can pay extra attention to how good a job your kids are doing with their daily oral hygiene. They should be brushing twice a day and flossing at least once each day. Drinking some water after eating a piece of candy can also be helpful.

It’s also important to keep up a regular schedule of routine dental visits. So if it’s been a while since your kids have been in for a checkup and cleaning, please contact us to schedule an appointment. You can learn more about kids’ oral health by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dentistry and Oral Health for Children.” And Dear Doctor’s full interview with Mayim Bialik is available here.

By Hobble Creek Dental Care
October 22, 2017
Category: Oral Health
FAQsAboutChildrensDentalDevelopment

Watching your newborn develop into a toddler, then an elementary schooler, a teenager, and finally an adult is one of the most exciting and rewarding experiences there is. Throughout the years, you’ll note the passing of many physical milestones — including changes that involve the coming and going of primary and permanent teeth. Here are some answers to frequently asked questions about children’s dental development.

When will I see my baby’s first tooth come in?
The two lower front teeth usually erupt (emerge from the gums) together, between the ages of 6 and 10 months. But your baby’s teeth may come earlier or later. Some babies are even born with teeth! You will know the first tooth is about to come in if you see signs of teething, such as irritability and a lot of drooling. The last of the 20 baby teeth to come in are the 2-year molars, so named for the age at which they erupt.

When do kids start to lose their baby teeth?
Baby teeth are generally lost in the same order in which they appeared, starting with the lower front teeth around age 6. Children will continue to lose their primary teeth until around age 12.

What makes baby teeth fall out?
Pressure from the emerging permanent tooth below the gum will cause the roots of the baby tooth to break down or “resorb” little by little. As more of the root structure disappears, the primary tooth loses its anchorage in the jawbone and falls out.

When will I know if my child needs braces?
Bite problems (malocclusions) usually become apparent when a child has a mixture of primary and permanent teeth, around age 6-8. Certain malocclusions are easier to treat while a child’s jaw is still growing, before puberty is reached. Using appliances designed for this purpose, orthodontists can actually influence the growth and development of a child’s jaw — to make more room for crowded teeth, for example. We can discuss interceptive orthodontics more fully with you at your child’s next appointment.

When do wisdom teeth come in and why do they cause problems?
Wisdom teeth (also called third molars) usually come in between the ages of 17 and 25. By that time, there may not be enough room in the jaw to accommodate them — or they may be positioned to come in at an angle instead of vertically. Either of these situations can cause them to push against the roots of a neighboring tooth and become trapped beneath the gum, which is known as impaction. An impacted wisdom tooth may lead to an infection or damage to adjacent healthy teeth. That it is why it is important for developing wisdom teeth to be monitored regularly at the dental office.

If you have additional questions about your child’s dental development, please contact us or schedule a consultation. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Losing a Baby Tooth” and “The Importance of Baby Teeth.”

By Hobble Creek Dental Care
October 07, 2017
Category: Oral Health
Tags: thumb sucking  
MonitoringYourChildsThumbSuckingCouldHelpAvoidFutureBiteProblems

Although distressing to many parents, infants and toddlers sucking their thumb is a common if not universal habit. Most children phase out of it by around age 4, usually with no ill effects. But thumb-sucking continuing into late childhood could prove problematic for a child’s bite.

Thumb sucking is related to how young children swallow. All babies are born with what is called an infantile swallowing pattern, in which they thrust their tongues forward while swallowing to ensure their lips seal around a breast or bottle nipple when they nurse. Thumb-sucking mimics this action, which most experts believe serves as a source of comfort when they’re not nursing.

Around 3 or 4, their swallowing transitions to a permanent adult swallowing pattern: the tip of the tongue now positions itself against the back of the top front teeth (you can notice it yourself when you swallow). This is also when thumb sucking normally fades.

If a child, however, has problems transitioning to an adult pattern, they may continue to thrust their tongue forward and/or prolong their thumb-sucking habit. Either can put undue pressure on the front teeth causing them to move and develop too far forward. This can create what’s known as an open bite: a slight gap still remains between the upper and lower teeth when the jaws are shut rather than the normal overlapping of the upper teeth over the lower.

While we can orthodontically treat an open bite, we can minimize the extent of any treatments if we detect the problem early and intervene with therapies to correct an abnormal swallowing pattern or prolonged thumb sucking. For the former we can assist a child in performing certain exercises that help retrain oral and facial muscles to encourage a proper swallowing pattern. This may also help diminish thumb sucking, but we may in addition need to use positive reinforcement techniques to further discourage the habit.

To stay ahead of possible problems with thumb sucking or the swallowing pattern you should begin regularly taking them to the dentist around their first birthday. It’s also a good idea to have an orthodontic evaluation around age 6 for any emerging bite problems. Taking these positive steps could help you avoid undue concern over this common habit.

If you would like more information on managing your child’s thumb-sucking habit, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “How Thumb Sucking Affects the Bite.”





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